Saturday

JULY 10TH

BIRTHDAYS
1905
Ivie Anderson, Vocal
b. Gilroy, CA, USA.
d. Dec. 28, 1949, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Best recalled for her work with Duke Ellington's band. Considered one of the finest singers of the golden age of jazz, Ivie Anderson was a fluent vocalist who impressed many with her blues and scat phrasings. Most impressed was Duke Ellington, who kept her on as vocalist for eleven years and would have kept on for more had she not retired due to health problems.
Born in California, young Ivie received vocal training at her local St. Mary's Convent and later spent two years studying with Sara Ritt in Washington, DC. Returning home she found work with Curtis Mosby, Paul Howard, Sonny Clay, and briefly with Anson Weeks at the Mark Hopkins Hotel in Los Angeles. She also found work in vaudeville, touring the country as a dancer and vocalist in the Fanchon and Marco revue, starring Mamie Smith, and with the Shuffle Along revue. She was featured vocalist at the Culver City Cotton Club before leaving to tour Australia in 1928 with Sonny Clay. Returning after five months down under she organized her own show and toured the U.S. In 1930 she found work with Earl Hines.
It was while appearing with Hines that Ellington first heard her sing. He hired her in February 1931, and she quickly became a fixture of the orchestra's sound. She gave voice to some of the band's most memorable tunes of the era, ''I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good,'' ''It Don't Mean a Thing,'' ''Stormy Weather,'' and ''Rose of the Rio Grande.'' She was also featured in the 1939 Marx Brothers' film A Day at the Races, '
Retiring in August 1942 due to chronic asthma she opened her own Chicken Shack restaurant in Los Angeles. Though continuing to sing regularly in West Coast nightclubs her medical condition kept her from recording or touring extensively and ultimately led to her early death. Ivie Anderson passed away in December of 1949.
1915
Milt Buckner
Organ/Piano/composer b. St.Louis, MO, USA.
d. 1977 USA.

Milt Buckner (10 July 191527 July 1977) was an American jazz pianist and organist, originally from St. Louis, Missouri. He was orphaned as a child, but an uncle in Detroit taught him to play. Buckner pioneered the parallel chords style which influenced Red Garland, George Shearing, and Oscar Peterson.

In 1941 he joined Lionel Hampton's big band ,and for the next seven years served as its pianist and staff arranger. He led a short-lived band of his own for two years, but then returned to Hampton's. Buckner pioneered the use of the electric organ. He died in Chicago, Illinois at the age of sixty-two.

Buckner's brother, Ted Buckner, was a noted jazz saxophonist.

BBC Radio 2

Bio- and discography
1916
Dick Cary
Piano/arranger/trumpet/alto horn b. Hartford, CT, USA.
d. April 6, 1994. First pianist in Louis Armstrong's (1947 to 1948) All-Stars.
Biography
~by Scott Yanow

Growing up near Los Angeles he wanted to be a jazz journalist early, discovering Dixieland in the Danny Kaye movie The Five Pennies and on a daily radio show while in high school. He soon broadened his tastes to theswing idiom and in college, after purchasing a Charlie Parker album that included "White Christmas" (which made it easier for him to appreciate bebop), he soon developed a strong taste and musical curiosity for all eras of jazz, from dixieland to the avant-garde, fusion to modern jazz.

Shortly after graduating from college, Yenow became the jazz editor forRecord Review, being a major participant in all 33 of its issues. Since Record Review closed up shop in June 1984, Yanow has written for many jazz magazines and arts magazines including Jazz Times, Jazziz, Downbeat, Cadence, Coda and the Los Angeles Jazz Scene. In recent times, Yanow was interviewed on-camera by CNN about the Monterey Jazz Festival and byArts & Entertainment for their televised American Masters biography on Dizzy Gillespie.

Yenow was a contributor to and co-editor of the third edition of the All Music Guide to Jazz. He contributed thousands of additional CD reviews to the third edition, becoming sole editor. He is one of the most prolific jazz record reviewers in history. He continues to contribute to Allmusic website.

In addition to his work for the All Music Guide to Jazz, Yanow has written ten books on jazz (see bibliography below).

Yanow has penned over 600 liner notes for many record labels. He has also written artist biographies and press releases for record labels, public relations firms and individual artists.

Yenow has produced a series of CDs for Allegro, worked as a consultant to other labels about their reissue projects, hosted a regular radio show (Jazz After Hours) for KCSN-FM, and worked as the jazz listings editor for the Los Angeles Times.

Dick Cary, Arranger Of Jazz, Dies at 77 - The New York Times
1919
Rusty Gill, vocals b. St. Louis, MO, USA Hillbilly-Music.com - Rusty Gill
1900
Elsie Evelyn Laye, vocals/actress b. London, England. U.K.
d. Feb. 1996, London, England, UK.
This strikingly beautiful soprano was the toast of the London stage for more than half a century. While still a teenager, she was already working on London's 'East End' stages. She subsequently won wide fame for her roles in such operettas as 'The Shop Girl' (1920), 'The Merry Widow' (1923) and Sigmund Romberg & Oscar Hammerstein's "The New Moon" (1929).
In 1929, she played the lead in the Broadway production of Noel Coward's "Bittersweet". While in the USA, she also appeared in several Hollywood films, including "The Night is Young" (1935), with co-star Ramon Novarro.
In the film, she introduced 'Romberg & Hammerstein's' "When I Grow Too Old to Dream". Laye was active on the London stage until 1969, and made concert appearances through 1992.
BIO # 2
~Wikipedia

Evelyn Laye OBE (10 July 1900 – 17 February 1996) was an English theatre actress.

Born as Elsie Evelyn Lay in Bloomsbury, London, England, Laye made her first stage appearance in August 1915 at the Theatre Royal, Brighton as Nang-Ping in Mr. Wu, and her first London appearance at the East Ham Palace on 24 April 1916, aged 15, in the revue Honi Soit, in which she subsequently toured.

For the first few years of her career played she mainly in musical comedy and operetta, including Going Up in 1918. Among her successes during the 1920s were Madame Pompadour (1923), The Dollar Princess, Blue Eyes (1928) and Lilac Time.

She made her Broadway debut in 1929 in Noel Coward's Bitter Sweet and appeared in several early talkie Hollywood films. She continued acting in such productions as The Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella. She acted several times opposite her second husband, actor Frank Lawton, including in the 1956 sitcomm My Husband and I. Other stage successes included Silver Wedding (1957; with Lawton), The Amorous Prawn (1959) andPhil the Fluter (1969).

1894
Jimmy McHugh, composer
b. Boston, MA, USA.
d. May 23, 1969, Beverley Hills, CA, USA.

James Francis McHugh (July 10, 1894 – May 23, 1969) was a U.S. composer. One of the most prolific songwriters from the 1920s to the 1950s, he composed over 270 songs. His songs were recorded by such artists as Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Judy Garland, Billie Holiday, Dinah Washington, June Christy and Peggy Lee.

Shirley Temple & Jimmy McHugh

Career

After struggling in a variety of jobs, including rehearsal pianist for the Boston Opera House and pianist/song plugger for Irving Berlin’s publishing company, in 1921, at the age of 26, McHugh relocated to New York City. Eventually finding employment as a professional manager with the prominent music publisher Jack Mills Inc., it was here that McHugh published his first song “Emaline”, and briefly teamed up with Irving Mills as The Hotsy Totsy Boys to write the hit song “Everything Is Hotsy Totsy Now”. This songwriting partnership was just the first of McHugh’s many illustrious collaborations, among them Ted Koehler (“I’m Shooting High”), Al Dubin (“South American Way”) and the great Harold Adamson (“It’s a Most Unusual Day”). As impressive as these master lyricists were, perhaps McHugh’s best symbiotic musical relationship was with the school teacher and poet Dorothy Fields.

Having written material for many of Harlem’s Cotton Club revues, it was no coincidence that their first combined success would be the score for the all-black Broadway musical Blackbirds of 1928, which jump-started the fledgling duo’s career with the memorable songs “I Can't Give You Anything But Love,” “Diga Diga Doo” and “I Must Have That Man.” Other hits written for the stage were soon to follow, including what is arguably their most famous composition, 1930’s “On The Sunny Side of the Street” for Lew Leslie’s International Revue, which also contained the favorite “Exactly Like You”; “Blue Again” for The Vanderbilt Revue; and in 1932, “Don’t Blame Me,” which was featured in the Chicago revue Clowns In Clover.

McHugh and Fields contributed title songs for films such as "Cuban Love Song", "Dinner at Eight" and "Hooray For Love", as well as “I Feel A Song Comin’ On” and “I’m In The Mood For Love” from 1935’s Every Night at Eight. In the artistically fruitful years 1930 through 1935, McHugh and Fields wrote over 30 songs for the film world.

Dorothy Fields & Jimmy McHugh

Works

Broadway credits
  • 1928 - Blackbirds of 1928 (lyrics by Dorothy Fields)
  • 1928 - Hello, Daddy (lyrics by Fields)
  • 1930 - International Revue (lyrics by Fields)
  • 1939 - The Streets of Paris (lyrics by Al Dubin)
  • 1940 - Keep Off The Grass (lyrics by Dubin and Howard Dietz)
  • 1948 - As the Girls Go (lyrics by Harold Adamson)
  • 1985 - "Sugar Babies
1900
Mitchell Parish
(aka: Parrish), lyricist b. Shreveport, LA, USA.
d. May 31, 1993, USA.
1904
Hociel Thomas, vocals/piano b. Houston, TX, USA.
d. Aug. 22, 1952, Oakland CA, USA.
Hociel was one of several well known early female 'Blues' singers that hailed from Texas (some others include Victoria Spivey (singer/guitarist. b. Oct. 15, 1906, Houston, TX, USA, d. Oct. 3, 1976, New York, NY, USA), Maggie Jones (née: Fae Barnes, b. c.1900. Hillsborough, TX, USA. d. unknown), and Beulah "Sippie" Wallace (b. Nov. 1, 1898, Houston, TX, USA, d. Nov. 1, 1986, Detroit, MI, USA. 87th birthday).
Hociel, like the other ladies above, recorded with many of the early Jazzmen including Armstrong, "King" Oliver, "Papa Mutt" Carey, Johnny Dodds, and well into the 1940s, with many others. Hociel was also a wonderful 'boogie-woogie' pianist (taught by her father, George) who carried on the tradition of her short-lived uncle, Hersal Thomas.
On Feb. 24, 1926, Okeh records released 4 sides with Hociel Thomas singing, backed by Louis Armstrong on Cornet, and pianist Hersal Thomas on piano. The four songs were "Deep Water Blues" (9519-A OKeh 8297), "Lonesome Hours" (9522-A Okeh 8297), "Listen To Ma (9521-A Okeh 8346), and "G'wan, I Told You" (9520-A Okeh 8346) The first three were listed on the label as composed by "Thomas", -but it was not stated if it was brother George W, brother Hersal, or Hociel, but perhaps it was a collaboration. ("G'wan" was listed as composed by Blair/Lethwick.)
LISTEN:
Notable Events Occurring
On This Date Include:
Mark Henry Barraud's original painting of Nipper
looking into an Edison Bell cylinder phonograph.
1900.
'His Master's Voice', a 'logo' of the Victor Recording Company, (later, RCA Victor), showing the dog, "Nipper", looking into the horn of a gramophone machine, was registered with the U.S. Patent Office. It would become one of the world's most famous trademarks.
1941.
Ferdinand 'Jelly Roll' Morton
pioneer jazz pianist
died in Los Angeles.
(Age: 56)
PBS - JAZZ Jelly Roll Morton
1950.
The radio show "Your Hit Parade", premiered first on the NBC TV network, and was later on the CBS TV network. Your Hit Parade - Wikipedia
Songs Recorded/Released
On This Date Include:
1920
Art Hickman and his Orchestra
1922
Harry Reser and his Orchestra
1923
Ellen Coleman accompanied by Lem Fowler's Orchestra
1924
Red Mckenzie and his Mound City Blue Blowers
Ray Miller's Orchestra 1923, Left to Right: Ward Archer, Charlie Rocco, Miff Mole, Danny Yates, Roy Johnston, Tony Satterfield, Louie Cassaign, Ray Miller, Frankie Trumbauer, Andy Sandolar, Rube Bloom, Billy Richards, Frink DePrima, Andy Sannella.
Ray Miller's Orchestra
1925
The Goofus Five
1926
Doc Cook's Dreamland Ballroom Orchestra in 1925; left to right: Bert Green, Fred Garland, Andrew Hilaire, Freddie Keppard, Elwood Graham, William Newton, Kenneth Anderson, Jerome Don Pasquall, Jimmie Noone, Doc Cook, Joe Poston, Robert Shelley, Johnny St. Cyr, Clifford King.
Cook and his Dreamland Orchestra
1929
Jelly Roll Morton's and his Orchestra
Victoria Spivey
1930
Fess Williams and his Royal Flush Orchestra
1936
Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra
Darktown Strutter's Ball

~Shelton Brooks

1917

I'll be down to get you in a taxi, Honey.

Better be ready 'bout half past eight.

Now, Honey, don't be late.

I wanna be there when

the band starts playing

Remember when we get there, Honey

Two steps, I'm gonna have a ball

I'm gonna dance off both my shoes

When they play those Jelly Roll Blues

Tomorrow night at the

Dark Town Strutters Ball.

I'll be down to get you in a taxi, Honey.

Better be ready 'bout half past eight.

Now, Honey, don't be late.

I wanna be there when

the band starts playing

Remember when we get there, Honey

Two step, we're gonna have a ball

I'm gonna dance off both my shoes

When they play those Jelly Roll Blues

Tomorrow night at the

Dark Town Strutters Ball.

Tomorrow night at the

Dark Town Strutters Ball.

brought to you by... ~confetta
Special Thanks To:
and all those who have provided content,
images and sound files for this site.

No comments: